512.266.7126 info@pristacorp.com

jazz trioWhat is the number one factor that everyone talks about when it comes to improving patient outcomes? Hands down it’s good patient communication. It’s well known that being in sync with your patient and his or her family early in the relationship is just as important as good clinical skills. But how do you know when that’s happening? How do you take relating with your patient to an art form?

Paul Haidet, MD, Director of Medical Education Research at Penn State College of Medicine, internist, and jazz DJ, made a unique discovery through his passion for jazz music (http://bit.ly/1xhC0ZZ). After years of research, he found that improvisation, a jazz hallmark, is a vital aspect of clinician-patient communication:  “Jazz is a musical conversation and for that conversation to be harmonious and interesting, you’ve got to not only play your own solo, but you’ve got to be able to listen to the meaning that the other musicians are playing…That’s when jazz is at its best and, to be honest, that’s when medicine is at its best, too.”

At a meeting of the American College of Physicians, Dr. Haidet and Gary Onady, MD, PhD, an internist and pediatrician, led a session about improving patient communication skills (http://bit.ly/1lihXVL): “They described a physician’s range of skills within his specialty as his instrument. They compared a patient’s chart with song sheets. The riff, they said, is a physician’s rapid recall of knowledge. A physician needs to be ready to improvise when he or she walks into an exam room and encounters unexpected aspects of a patient’s illness.”

Fourth-year medical students at Penn State University get an opportunity to take Dr. Haidet’s class, “Jazz and the Art of Medicine.” Four fundamental skills are taught throughout the course:

  1. Managing the tension between structure and freedom.
  2. Finding meaning in another person’s communication.
  3. Finding your voice as a communicator.
  4. Using space effectively, i.e. allowing the patient to speak, rather than interrupting during the course of a conversation.

Good patient communication skills are for everyone involved in the patient care continuum. Anyone who participates on any level with the people coming to your hospital for care has to be in tune with effective interpersonal skills.  What is your communication style? Can you trade solos with your patient? Maybe an evening with Miles Davis might provide some insight.

 

 

Prista uses tracking codes and cookies

Prista uses the same sort of tracking mechanisms that are used on nearly every site you visit, but we don't, compile a behavioral profile on visitors, sell or share any such tracking data, track any other browsing or other behavior you do on other sites, do anything else that the average person would consider intrusive or creepy. Please use the Accept button below to accept our our practice of tracking cookies. You can also Decline button to continue to visit our website without any data being saved.